Pier Paolo Calzolari

Senza titolo [1°e secondo giorno come gli orienti sono due]

Untitled [1st and second day as the Orients are two] 

Melton fabric, blue fluorescent tubes, transformer, dimmer box
1970

Courtesy of Fondazione Calzolari Archive, from the Collection of Fondo Calzolari Trust

Pier Paolo Calzolari (b. 1943) is recognized as one of the original members of Arte Povera. He is known for his sculptural installations which make use of elemental materials such as plants, fire, lead, and most notably, frost. His works often explore the nature of existence and ideas of personal and collective memory. Calzolari’s works are included in the collections of the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Art Institute of Chicago, and Centre Pompidou in Paris among others.

  • Tab-1
  • Tab-2
  • Tab-3
  • Tab-4
  • The installation features six fluorescent neon texts framed against soft white mattresses. The words remain unclear as the neon tubes curve and bend to form the string of phrases in a mix of three languages—English, Italian, and Latin. The focus shifts not on the meaning of the words themselves but to the sensuous and dreamlike contrast of the surfaces.

  • The installation features six fluorescent neon texts framed against soft white mattresses. The words remain unclear as the neon tubes curve and bend to form the string of phrases in a mix of three languages—English, Italian, and Latin. The focus shifts not on the meaning of the words themselves but to the sensuous and dreamlike contrast of the surfaces.

  • The installation features six fluorescent neon texts framed against soft white mattresses. The words remain unclear as the neon tubes curve and bend to form the string of phrases in a mix of three languages—English, Italian, and Latin. The focus shifts not on the meaning of the words themselves but to the sensuous and dreamlike contrast of the surfaces.

  • The installation features six fluorescent neon texts framed against soft white mattresses. The words remain unclear as the neon tubes curve and bend to form the string of phrases in a mix of three languages—English, Italian, and Latin. The focus shifts not on the meaning of the words themselves but to the sensuous and dreamlike contrast of the surfaces.