Marisa Merz

Senza titolo

Untitled

Copper wire, nails, canvas on frame
1976

Collection of Fondazione Merz

Marisa Merz (1926-2019) was the sole female artist of the Arte Povera movement. Her works blur the distinctions between domestic objects and art objects, making use of everyday materials like blankets, bowls of salt, and copper wires. She often left her works unnamed and undated, claiming that artmaking operated “beyond time.” In 2013, Merz received the Golden Lion award for lifetime achievement at the Venice Biennale. 

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  • Her work in the exhibit reveals her poetic sensibilities and her delightful simplicity through all these copper wires knitted by her own hands. By choosing copper, the artist brings out the delicateness and intricacy of the material. Stretching them to squares using brass-head nails along the wall evokes strength as well; stable yet fragile. Some bare, noting their absence. The irregular arrangement on the wall still maintains a sense of connection, like a constellation, and that it is still growing.

  • Her work in the exhibit reveals her poetic sensibilities and her delightful simplicity through all these copper wires knitted by her own hands. By choosing copper, the artist brings out the delicateness and intricacy of the material. Stretching them to squares using brass-head nails along the wall evokes strength as well; stable yet fragile. Some bare, noting their absence. The irregular arrangement on the wall still maintains a sense of connection, like a constellation, and that it is still growing.

  • Her work in the exhibit reveals her poetic sensibilities and her delightful simplicity through all these copper wires knitted by her own hands. By choosing copper, the artist brings out the delicateness and intricacy of the material. Stretching them to squares using brass-head nails along the wall evokes strength as well; stable yet fragile. Some bare, noting their absence. The irregular arrangement on the wall still maintains a sense of connection, like a constellation, and that it is still growing.

  • Her work in the exhibit reveals her poetic sensibilities and her delightful simplicity through all these copper wires knitted by her own hands. By choosing copper, the artist brings out the delicateness and intricacy of the material. Stretching them to squares using brass-head nails along the wall evokes strength as well; stable yet fragile. Some bare, noting their absence. The irregular arrangement on the wall still maintains a sense of connection, like a constellation, and that it is still growing.