Mario Merz

Senza titolo

Untitled

Metal structure, clamps, stones
1991

Collection of Fondazione Merz

Mario Merz (1925-2003) was an artist and the husband of Marisa Merz. He was a member of the anti-Fascist group Giustizia e Libertà during World War II prior to joining the Arte Povera movement in 1967. Merz’s most well-known works are his free-standing igloo structures made of found objects such as stone and broken glass. He was deeply interested in the organic growth of natural elements and in exploring the relationships between art and nature.

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  • The artist is fascinated with Fibonacci progression — its association with organic growth processes and the geometry of nature. His works are drawn upon the inspiration of an igloo, which for him is an ideal shelter. It has many iterations but always consists of a dome-shaped metal skeleton covered with various materials such as stone, glass, branches, burlap, cut into irregular shapes and retains. Being a make-shift and a temporary structure, the slab of stones are clamped together. The ‘Elemental Beauty’ still remains through it.

  • The artist is fascinated with Fibonacci progression — its association with organic growth processes and the geometry of nature. His works are drawn upon the inspiration of an igloo, which for him is an ideal shelter. It has many iterations but always consists of a dome-shaped metal skeleton covered with various materials such as stone, glass, branches, burlap, cut into irregular shapes and retains. Being a make-shift and a temporary structure, the slab of stones are clamped together. The ‘Elemental Beauty’ still remains through it.

  • The artist is fascinated with Fibonacci progression — its association with organic growth processes and the geometry of nature. His works are drawn upon the inspiration of an igloo, which for him is an ideal shelter. It has many iterations but always consists of a dome-shaped metal skeleton covered with various materials such as stone, glass, branches, burlap, cut into irregular shapes and retains. Being a make-shift and a temporary structure, the slab of stones are clamped together. The ‘Elemental Beauty’ still remains through it.

  • The artist is fascinated with Fibonacci progression — its association with organic growth processes and the geometry of nature. His works are drawn upon the inspiration of an igloo, which for him is an ideal shelter. It has many iterations but always consists of a dome-shaped metal skeleton covered with various materials such as stone, glass, branches, burlap, cut into irregular shapes and retains. Being a make-shift and a temporary structure, the slab of stones are clamped together. The ‘Elemental Beauty’ still remains through it.