Author: @metmuseumph

Our Built Environments

Our Built Environments: Withstanding Disaster and Responsive Design

Tuesday, 1 September 2020

Type:
Webinar and Exhibition Launch

Date:
September 1

Venue:
Zoom and Facebook Live

Speakers:
Professor Kurakata Shunsuke, exhibition curator

Kurokawa Sho, architect

Ar. Jo Miranda, UAP Emergency Architects

Engr. Lorena Hernandez, TAO-Pilipinas

Time:
4:00 PM PH | 5:00 PM JP

Duration:
90 Minutes (approximately)

Facebook Event Page

Join a dialogue with Japanese and Filipino architects and an engineer as they share their projects in disaster-response and post-calamity contexts, and the environmental conditions which factor in their practice. Together with the curator, they will discuss and reflect on the role of architecture and design in the built environments of Japan and the Philippines.
 
This webinar opens the exhibit, ‘Built Environment: An Alternative Guide to Japan’ presented by The Japan Foundation, Manila and the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, in cooperation with Embassy of Japan in the Philippines, and with the support of JT International (Philippines) Inc. An online gallery and a virtual exhibition tour will be launched featuring photographs, text, and videos designed to mirror Japan’s unique archipelagic formation, the exhibition presents a total of 80 buildings, civil-engineering projects, and landscapes from each of Japan’s 47 prefectures, extending from the modern era of the late 19th century to the present.
 
Registration is now closed. The webinar will be broadcasted live on the Metropolitan Museum of Manila Facebook page.
 
This event is FREE and open to everyone so see you then!

Built Environment: An Alternative Guide to Japan

Built Environment: An Alternative Guide to Japan

Tall Galleries

As an archipelagic nation with a diverse geography often prone to precarious natural phenomena such as typhoons, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes, Japan has consistently created structures which respond to such environmental conditions. These circumstances deeply resonate with the Philippine experience, given the country’s shared archipelagic formation and vulnerability to natural calamities. The exhibit Built Environment: An Alternative Guide to Japan aims to reflect on the relationships between such geographically diverse and environmentally vulnerable spaces, and the historical, cultural, and social contexts of the people who occupy them.

The exhibition uses a combination of photographs, video images, and text to present a total of 80 buildings, civil-engineering projects, and landscapes from the 47 prefectures of Japan built from the modern era of the late 19th century to the present. during the past century. Conceived as a way to provide an alternative guide to the culture, history, and landscape of Japan, Built Environment can also contribute to a meaningful dialogue with Filipino audiences in the context of these uncertain times. The exhibition concept is curated by architectural historian Shunsuke Kurakata, landscape -design scholar Satoshi Hachima, and Kenjiro Hosaka, who is the curator of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.

The exhibition is presented by the Japan Foundation, Manila and the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, in cooperation with Embassy of Japan in the Philippines, and with the support of JT International (Philippines) Inc.

Hakusui Dam

Japan’s Most Beautiful Dam

Hakusui Dam

Hakusui Dam, built in 1938, is often heralded as “Japan’s Most Beautiful Dam.” Yasuo Ono, a local engineer, seems to have focused all of his energies on systematically implementing the plan, design, and construction of the dam. In the process, he devised the dam’s curved and stepped revetments, the structure’s most distinctive features, which were created to deal with the difficult problem of decreasing the load on the unstable soft ground. His way of beautifully and elaborately integrating these shapes later earned Ono great esteem.

  • Hakusui Dam

    Takeda, Oita Prefecture

    Yasuo Ono

    1938

  • Hakusui Dam

    Takeda, Oita Prefecture

    Yasuo Ono

    1938

Miike Coal Mine and Miike Port

A Coal Mine that Supported Modernization

Miike Coal Mine and Miike Port

The Miike Coal Mine is Japan’s largest domestic coal mine, and is the second of its kind to have undergone modernization. Serving to support the development of Japan’s industry, the mine’s main pitheads were the Miyanohara pit and the Manda pit. Miike Port was developed in order to internationally export coal collected from the Miike Coal Mine, and is the only port in Japan to operate on a lock system. An exclusive railway service operates from the coal mine to the port, and the pitheads, railway, and port are all listed as part of a designated World Heritage Site. Miike Port continues to be in use today, and those who had been involved in the overall development of the Miike Coal Mine had taken part in the construction of the port in hopes that it could become a basis for industry even should there come a time when coal could no longer be harvested.

  • Miike Coal Mine and Miike Port

    Kumamoto, Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture and

    Arao, Kumamoto Prefecture

    (First photo) Courtesy of Arao City

    (Second photo) Courtesy of Omuta City

  • Miike Coal Mine and Miike Port

    Kumamoto, Omuta, Fukuoka Prefecture and

    Arao, Kumamoto Prefecture

    (First photo) Courtesy of Arao City

    (Second photo) Courtesy of Omuta City

Kofuin (Former Kumamoto Higher Technical School Lecture Hall)

Approaching the Past through Creative Preservation

Kofuin (Former Kumamoto Higher Technical School Lecture Hall)

After an attempt by the architect Yasufumi Kijima, who was working as a teacher at a local prefectural university, to preserve a former technical school lecture hall (built in 1908) went unheeded, he acquired the structural components and turned the building into his private residence. While retaining the original exterior, Kijima manipulated the plans and sections to fit the building’s new purpose, enhancing the “otherness” of the old elements and design details. This structure is not only critical of the idea that “newly built is best,” but also of academic preservation and regionalism regards an existing design or place as sacred.

  • Kofuin (Former Kumamoto Higher Technical School Lecture Hall)

    Aso, Kumamoto Prefecture

    Yasufumi Kijima 

    1908, 1976 (relocated)

    (First and Third) Photo credit: Satoshi Asakawa, first and second photo

    (Second, black and white) Courtesy of Takashi Kitano

  • Kofuin (Former Kumamoto Higher Technical School Lecture Hall)

    Aso, Kumamoto Prefecture

    Yasufumi Kijima 

    1908, 1976 (relocated)

    (First and Third) Photo credit: Satoshi Asakawa, first and second photo

    (Second, black and white) Courtesy of Takashi Kitano

Saikai Bridge

Foundation for the Construction of a Long-span Bridge

Saikai Bridge

It was in 1955, ten years after the end of World War II, that the Saikai Bridge, boasting a single,  braced-rib arch with a span of 243.7 meters, opened across the fast-flowing sea and whirlpools of Inoura-seto, Nagasaki Prefecture. In addition to signaling the start of economic growth and postwar restoration, the bridge provided a foundation for the construction of Japan’s longest long-span bridge. Looking up at the bridge, we are struck by its extremely delicate and transparent quality. Despite the bridge’s great length, this vividly conveys the fact that it was created by human hand.

  • Saikai Bridge

    Sasebo and Saikai, Nagasaki Prefecture

    Iwao Yoshida 

    1955

  • Saikai Bridge

    Sasebo and Saikai, Nagasaki Prefecture

    Iwao Yoshida 

    1955

Former Glover House

Veranda Colonial Style that Alighted in Japan

Former Glover House

This timber-framed house is the oldest extant Western-style house in Japan. It was built in 1863 and assumed its present-day appearance around 1887, when additions were completed. The house includes a wraparound veranda, doric columns, and arched doors and windows, all of which were unprecedented in Japan. Even so, it also relies on typical Edo-period technologies. Around when the Glover House was built, veranda colonial style houses like those built by Westerners in India and Southeast Asia became popular in Japan and led to other fusional works, including the giyofu buildings.

  • Former Glover House

    Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture

    1863

    http://www.glover-garden.jp/english

  • Former Glover House

    Nagasaki, Nagasaki Prefecture

    1863

    http://www.glover-garden.jp/english

Arita

The Modernization of Porcelain

Arita

Arita is known as the birthplace of Japan’s porcelain industry. Porcelain produced in the town of Arita was exported to Europe extensively from the second half of the 17th century through the East India Company, receiving high acclaim in international exhibitions, namely the Paris Expo in the late 19th century. At the same time Arita had succeeded in manufacturing Japan’s first porcelain insulator, and furthermore from the shadows had supported the nation’s course of modernization including the development of the telegraph and the railways. The area’s intermittently prosperous history is reflected in its city’s streets in which Japanese styles and Western styles appear to integrate and coexist. In addition “Tonbai Fences” that are made out of used fireproof bricks from climbing-kilns and old-fashioned potteries, are a unique feature that is observed solely in the town of Arita.

  • Arita

    Arita, Saga Prefecture

  • Arita

    Arita, Saga Prefecture

Ryukyu Islands

Ryukyu Islands

The Ryukyu Islands are a chain of islands extending from the southern part of Kyushu to northeastern Taiwan. This small archipelago serves as the delineation between the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea. It consists of 55 islands and islets which are divided into three groups: Amami, Okinawa, and Sakishima. Okinawa in particular used to be called “the Ryukyu Kingdom”. Their unique culture, a blend of a variety of cultures of neighboring areas in Asia, is still alive today.

Nago City Hall