THE PHILIPPINE CONTEMPORARY: TO SCALE THE PAST AND THE POSSIBLE

The Philippine Contemporary: to scale the past and the possible

The Philippine Contemporary: to scale the past and the possible
Upper Galleries

A landmark long-term exhibition of the Metropolitan Museum of Manila, The Philippine Contemporary: to scale the past and the possible launches the museum’s new strategic direction to integrate a heightened focus on modern and contemporary art by Philippine and foreign artists. The exhibition charts the development of modern art and the vitality of contemporary art in the Philippines.

Curated by renowned art critic and scholar, Dr. Patrick D. Flores, the exhibit encompasses a wide range of forms, from painting, installations, visual culture and popular media such as comics, photography, film, and video.

The past is history, culture, and tradition. The possible is the future, expectation, and hope. The past and the possible both partake of circumstance and context, and therefore of chance.

The major sections of the exhibition – Horizon, Trajectory and Latitude – index the variety and chronology of styles, movements, institutions, and collectives that marked the significant shifting tides in Philippine art history from the early 20th century to the present. While with the two last sections – Sphere and Direction – this exhibition keeps the dynamic and diverse pulse of artistic expression alive.

Horizon
1915 – 1964
Portrait of Fernanda de Jesus, 1915 | Fernando Amorsolo
Venus, 1951 | Guillermo Tolentino
Rusted Steel, Undated | J. Elizalde Navarro
Bending Nude, 1952 | Napoleon Abueva
Trajectory
1965 – 1983
Mother and Child, 1975 | Solomon Saprid
Triune-1995, 1995 | Ramon Orlina
Sitsiritsit Alibangbang, 1986 | Lazaro Soriano
Prusisyon, 1982 | Duddley Diaz
Latitude
1984 – Present
Straight No Chaser, 2007 | Louie Cordero
Phosphorescent Gospel, 2011 | Gerardo Tan
Triple Goddess, 1983 | Agnes Arellano
Tao-tao: Bagobo Myth of Creation, 1997 | Roberto Feleo
Sphere
Passion of Complements, 1955 | Alfoso Ossorio
Karwahe, 1993 | Mark Justiniani
Silay 315, 1976 | Lino Severino
The Saints Come Marching, 2002 | Dennis Ascalon